Limestone Genre Expo

Workshops


​​Speculative Futurisms - Derek Newman-Stille


Speculative fiction is less about imagining new technologies, and more about imagining the potential social and cultural ramifications of new technologies - how technologies change people. Participants will be introduced to some exciting new technological innovations and will then engage in exercises meant to explore the way that these new technologies could change society, the way people interact with each other, the way we interact with our bodies, and change the way people think of themselves. Although we will be looking at technology, we will be exploring ideas of what it means to be human and how to bring these ideas into our writing. Participants will get a chance to imagine and write new worlds of wonder that come from changes in our technological apparatus.


​WRITING the HISTORICAL MYSTERY - Caro Soles


You need all the regular things like good characters, dialogue, sense of place and a body or two. But when you put all this in another era, everything changes. Find out the do's and don'ts in this fun workshop!


Introduction to Scrivener for Writers- Kim McDougall

Are you ready to move beyond MS Word, Apple Pages and other word processing software? Learn a program that allows tremendous creative flexibility and powerful outlining tools. Keep everything at your fingertips: outline, multiple drafts, research, character sketches and world building. 

This introductory course in Scrivener will cover:

Creating a project and importing your manuscript
Navigating in the workspace
Using the cork board and outlining tools
Organizing your research and background information
Exporting your manuscript as Word, PDF of eBook
Advanced tips and tricks

This workshop runs about two hours and attendees leave with a pdf cheatsheet for some of Scrivener’s more advanced options.


How to Market and Sell Short Fiction - Douglas Smith


A wealth of courses and books exist to teach you how to write stories. But what happens when you've finished writing? Do you know how to sell what you've written?

Based on Doug's popular writer's guide, Playing the Short Game: How to Market & Sell Short Fiction,this workshop will give you critical advice on how to sell your short stories to professional markets and to build a career as a short fiction writer. Topics covered include: rights and licensing for short fiction, a strategy for selecting your target markets, finding short fiction markets, selecting the right market, submitting short fiction to a market, and what not to do when submitting.

"We short story writers have needed a book like this for decades. ... It’s spectacular." —Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Award-winning Author & Editor, commenting on Playing the Short Game


World Building - Alyssa Cooper


Urban Fantasy, one of the more recently recognized sub-genres under the wide Fantasy umbrella, presents a unique challenge in terms of world-building: unlike high-fantasy and portal fantasy, in which the constructed world often exists isolated from reality, in Urban Fantasy, we as authors must construct a world that stands on its own fantastical feet, while still integrating itself seamlessly into the world that we exist in every day.

In this workshop, we will discuss different approaches to creating a world within a world, exploring the ways in which the fantastical can exist alongside the commonplace.


Building Your Readership - Eve Langlais

USA Today and New York Times Bestseller Eve Langlais will discuss some of the techniques and marketing tools she's employed to engage her readership and create a dedicated fan base.


Developing a Character's Backstory - Bob MacKenzie

​ Every character, central or peripheral, plays a role in carrying the story forward.  Knowing something about your character's back-story will help you bring that character to life for the reader.  The more you know about the character, the more realistic he or she will be.  A character without a back-story may end up seeming only a paper cutout. Let's talk about:

1. how to develop a character's story,

2. how much of the character's story you need to know,

3. how much of the back-story you need to reveal to the reader, 
4. how and and how soon to reveal elements of the back-story,

5. how to blend elements of the back-story smoothly into your main story line so they don't seem to be stuck in. 


​Writing Flash Fiction - Rob Brunet


Telling a story in less than a thousand words forces an author to focus on its most essential elements. Every piece—character, dialogue, setting, or action—has to do heavy lifting. Layering a beginning, middle, and end into a single narrative thrust can turn a single moment in time into a satisfying read. Come prepared with a clean draft of your own story (four copies, printed double-spaced) if you’d like an opportunity for instructor-led peer feedback.This workshop will be led by Rob Brunet, who has placed flash fiction with Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, Shotgun Honey, and Out of the Gutter.